oh, what a tangled web we weave...
Lynx Sources & Resources
HTML Authoring Links
Web Accessibility Resources

Table of Contents

download Blynx32 (705k): a blind-tailored distribution of the latest Windows 9x/NT port of Lynx; includes instructions on how to add support for multimedia events

lingua franca be damned! Circumnavigating the Web with Lynx and Kermit details how to crawl the web in any of the languages/charsets supported by Kermit

thedirectory, "the most complete directory of Internet Service/Access Providers & BBSes available online", contains information about ISPs in over 100 countries

a similar service is provided by The List, which lists ISPs by:
state or province
area code
country code
and country
find your user agent and IP address with SAILOR

Lynx: Sources and Resources

While Lynx now has its own web site, the motherlode of information on Lynx, updates, patches, and all manner of Lynx-related information is still Subir Grewal's Lynx Links, the site formally known as the Lynx Enhanced pages...

Lynx Help!--if you're using Lynx and these pages don't automatically appear when you type 'h', bookmark 'em, Dano!

BLYNX: Speech- and Braille-Friendly Documentation and Support

Al Gilman's Lynx FAQ

Mark Mentovai's Lynx Page, which contains his SSL Patch for Lynx 2.8.x

Scott McGee's SLCC Lynx Pages

give something back by signing the Lynx Developer's Guestbook, and let Foteos and the rest of the Lynx-Dev consortium know just how much you appreciate Lynx


Lynx-Related Mailing Lists


Assorted Lynx Links

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Lynx 2.8.4

Lynx 2.8.4 was released by The Lynx Developmental Consortium on July 17, 2001. This distribution incorporates the 2.8.3 distribution, released April 23, 2000, along with all of the subsequently issued bug fixes and upgrade patches. Anyone contemplating compiling their own version of Lynx should consider using Tom Dickey and Jim Spath's experimental Autoconfigure Script, after consulting Subir Grewal's Utilitarian Guide to Building and Installing Lynx and/or Larry Virden's Average Users' Lynx Installation Guide.

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How Can I Preview a Newer Version of Lynx?

The following is a list of sites that permit public Lynx access via telnet the sites are listed in descending order by version number--in other words, the most recent releases first, older versions last. The first line of each entry contains the telnet address, the second line the login name you need to use, and the third line contains the password, while the fourth line states which version of Lynx is available at that site.

Note that the default setting for most of the publicly accessible versions of Lynx is "numbers act as arrows", so the first thing you will need to do after logging in is:

  1. type 'o' to raise the Options Menu
  2. type 'k' to activate the 'K)eypad as arrows or Numbered links' field
  3. hit the spacebar once and you should hear/see/feel the value change to: Links are Numbered
  4. hit enter
  5. exit the Options Menu by typing 'r'

SITE 1. telnet://sailor.lib.md.us
login as: guest
no password--press enter 3 times, then type 1 and hit enter to access Lynx with both "links as numbers" and "show_cursor" (2 important settings for speech and braille access) turned on
version: 2.8.3 (set to report links as numbers)
this is one of the few publicly accessible versions of Lynx for which random URL loading (invoked by typing a "g") is enabled, for which, major kudos are due to the Maryland Public Library System

SITE 2. telnet://trfn.clpgh.org
login as: trfn
no password--press enter once to access lynx
version 2.7.1 (note: need to set lynx to report links as numbers)
this is one of the few publicly accessible versions of lynx upon which random URL loading (invoked by typing a "g") is not disabled, for which, major kudos are due to the Three-Rivers FreeNet

SITE 3. telnet://public.sunsite.unc.edu
login as: lynx
no password, you will be prompted to choose a terminal type
version 2.6 (set to report links as numbers)
warning: the G)o to URL command is disabled, which means that you can only follow links

SITE 4. telnet://lynx.cc.ukans.edu
login as: lynx
when prompted for password simply hit <enter>
version 2.5 (note: need to set lynx to report numbered links)
warning: the G)o to URL command is disabled, which means that you can only follow links

SITE 5. telnet://philadelphia.libertynet.org
login as: liberty
no password needed
version: apparently 2.2 -- only use this as a last resort
warning: the G)o to URL command is disabled, which means that you can only follow links

Of course, the drawback to using a publicly available version of Lynx is that you can't save links to a bookmark file, nor can you use a personal lynx.cfg or .lynxrc (the configuration files that allow you to save your tailored settings and use them as the default settings) still, using a newer version of lynx should fill you with enough righteous indignation that you won't rest--or, rather, you won't let your sys admin rest--until he or she upgrades... and if you need ammunition to bolster your arguments for an upgrade, consult:

<http://www.crl.com/~subir/lynx/upgrade.html>
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UKans, Where It All Began

WARNING! most of the information archived at UKans is obsolete, as the University of Kansas ceased supporting Lynx with the release of Lynx 2.4.2 in September 1995. The following links are indexed here as a service to those users whose ISPs adamantly refuse to upgrade. For information about the latest release of Lynx, consult Subir Grewal's Extremely Lynx, check out his strategies for persuading your ISP to upgrade Lynx, or, simply download the current release of Lynx, along with the latest patches, and email it to your sys admin!

Old Lynx Help Files

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Lynx Ports:
Offline Versions of the Text-Based Browser

Sub-Index
1) Lynx Ports for DOS 386+ and Win95/NT
2) Self-Installing Lynx for DOS
3) BOBCAT: a text-based web browser for DOS
4) DOSLynx
5) MacLynx: Lynx on a Macintosh
6) Lynx for OS/2

Lynx Ports for DOS 386+ or Win32 (95/NT)

The current developmental Lynx is continuously being ported to two new PC platforms. The ports are for Win32 (95 and NT only) and for 386+ PCs running DOS. The term port means that these versions will be able to follow the development of Lynx as it continues to grow. If you have a PC with a processor less than 386 (i.e. 286), then you might want to investigate other DOS-based options such as Bobcat or Nettamer.

The Win32 version, Lynx32 (lynx_w32.zip) will work on Win95 or WinNT using the standard winsock. It will NOT work with Win3.11, not even with win32s and wolverine installed. It is a console application, which means that it appears to run in a DOS box within Windows 95/NT, but it that it accesses the Windows network layer and other kernel functions directly.

Note, that although Lynx32 is a Win32 version of Lynx, it still works in text mode and NOT as a GUI. If you are using speech-synthesis, this means that you can use either a DOS-based screen-reader or a windows-based screen reader capable of reading windowed DOS boxes to voice Lynx. If you are using a screen-reader, you should download the blind-tailored version of the current Lynx32 release

The 386+ version, lynx_386.zip runs in DOS and requires a 386 or higher and some sort of packet driver. if you get a no DPMI error message when you attempt to run Lynx386, you need to download csdpmi3b.zip If you get a coprocessor not available error message when you attempt to run Lynx386, you need emu387.dxe

NOTE: As of the latest release, Lynx386 does not yet support FTP or NEWS.

Since there are a lot of quirks and tricks to maximizing the usability of the PC ports of Lynx, be sure to read the readme.txt to find answers to the most frequently asked questions about the PC ports.

For the latest information concerning the PC ports of Lynx, please consult Wayne Buttle's Lynx Port Pages.

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Rene Ludwig's lynx_kit

Rene Ludwig's lynx_kit.exe: an executable file which contains the current build of Lynx ported for use in the DOS environment, a PPP packet driver, and configuration files for several different ISPs. (Note: Requires at least a 386 PC with a math coprocesser.)


BOBCAT:
A Text- and Lynx-Based DOS Web Browser

BOBCAT is a text-based web browser, developed by Wayne Buttles and John Lewis, that runs in a DOS environment. Bobcat, by definition, is a small Lynx. To quote Wayne:

The name was picked to imply that it is a less mature sibling to the Lynx browser. Bobcat started life as Lynx2-4-2. The reason 2-4-2 was chosen is because starting at 2-5, many files in the Lynx distribution became too big to compile out of the package targeted towards a plain DOS version. There have been many changes since 2-4-2, however, it does support many things that DOSLYNX didn't. I have also made many modifications to Bobcat's original behavior to make it more functional.
... After that I made personal decisions on what to support. Although it may disappoint some people, news support is not in Bobcat. It never worked correctly in DOSLYNX and I didn't feel it was a priority. Gopher and Ftp should hopefully work to some degree, but they are not the top priority either. The important thing, as far as I am concerned, is good web support. This is the reason for cutting corners on the other features. There is a new feature added to Bobcat that will allow people to define external programs for certain URLs. This product uses the SPAWNO routines by Ralf Brown to minimize memory use while shelling to DOS and running other programs. Hopefully this will help compensate for Bobcat's shortcomings.
This new Lynx for DOS is a big switch from DOSLYNX. It is Curses based, so it looks like the real Lynx. It does not have pull down menus or a multiple document interface. I prefer the real Lynx interface which is partially why I made the switch in development. Other good reasons for starting with a new code base are support for forms, numeric links, view source, history list and other features which were not available in DOSLYNX. ...
The first versions of Bobcat have severe memory constraints because of the way the original Lynx was designed. In Un*x, programs assume they have unlimited memory and the programs are coded as such. Bobcat has yet to have memory checking added to it, so when you run out of the tiny amount of conventional memory available it will very unceremoniously drop you to the DOS prompt.

It is important to note that Bobcat is NOT a true Lynx port. It is a work based on Lynx--specifically, Lynx 2.4.2 This means that it can not keep up with the current Lynx development code, nor can Lynx patches be added to Bobcat. While the 386 and Win32 ports of Lynx have this ability, Bobcat can run on older PCs--even those with a 8086 processor. This also means, however, that Bobcat has some serious limitations, including a tendency to crash when it encounters pages larger than 100 kilobytes large. Yet, if you are using a pre-386 computer to access the internet, Bobcat is an extremely speech-friendly web-access solution.

Bobcat is currently in its fifth release, and is available as a self-extracting archive, BCAT-E05.EXE, which was released on September 17, 1997. It now supports many, if not most, CGA adapters. The 0.5 package also has new TCP drivers, dialers, and support documentation, including an interactive tutorial. Consult the Bobcat change.log for complete information on new features and bugfixes--a brief listing of which follows:

Changes to Bobcat Executable Package, 17 September 1997 (E-05)

  1. Changes to lynx.exe
  2. Changes to external programs and documents

The latest version of Bobcat can always be found at:

<http://www.fdisk.com/doslynx/bobcats/>
More Information About BOBCAT from Wayne Buttles
1. About Bobcat
2. Get Bobcat
3. Bobcat licence
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MacLynx Beta Released

Oliver Gutknecht, of the Laboratoire d'Informatique, Robotique et Micro-Electronique de Montpellier, has developed a Lynx port that runs on the Macintosh. The release, MacLynx 2.7.1 beta1, was last updated on July 1, 1997, and should run on PowerPC and 680x0 Macs with System 7.1 or later (7.5 preferred), with MacTCP or OpenTransport, with 1 Mb (2 Mb preferred).

The source code is based on the release of Lynx, version 2.7.1, with some additions from later developmental versions.

Two Notes of Caution:

  1. Since beta1 is the first public version of MacLynx, it has not been tested on a large number of configurations.
  2. Since MacLynx is developed and tested on a PowerMac, it might be less stable when run on a 680x0

A StuffIt archive containing 680x0 & PowerPC binaries of MacLynx, can be obtained from:

<http://www.lirmm.fr/~gutkneco/maclynx/maclynx_beta1.sit.hqx> (France)

For more information, contact Olivier Gutknecht:

<gutkneco@lirmm.fr>

or consult his web site for more information

To keep abreast of current developments in the evolution of MacLynx, consult:

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Lynx for OS/2

A port of Lynx 2.7.1 & 2.8 for OS/2 is available from:

<http://studentweb.tulane.edu/~jmcbray/lynx/>

The port was developed by Jason McBrayer <Jason.McBrayer@tulane.edu> and is being used successfully on systems at Tulane.

Another option is "Lynx/2", a divergent text browser for OS/2 based on a very old Lynx. It has undergone extensive unilateral development (code which has not been publicly released for inclusion into the "mainstream" Lynx) and can handle tables, frames, and java with relative ease. Binaries and more detailed information about Lynx/2 are available from:

<http://www.cris.com/~djd/products.html>

Lynx/2 is being developed by Derek Decker. Users of Lynx/2 are strongly encouraged to email Derek Decker at <djd@cris.com> to ask him to release the source for Lynx/2 so that the work he has done on expanding Lynx's capabilities and roboustness can be used in the development of "mainstream" Lynx.

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Self-Voicing, Non-Visual & Non-Graphical Browsers

Text-Based Browsers

Self-Voicing Browsers

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Using Lynx to Learn, Design, and Edit HTML

this section is under construction--please return often to check on the progress of this tutorial

Validators & Repair Tools

Online HTML Validation Services

check your HTML code for errors with:


Correction & Repair Utilities



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Doctor HTML

Doctor HTML retrieves a Web page and performs several tests to test the robustness of your document. Select which tests you want Doctor HTML to perform, enter the URL that you want the Doctor to examine, and choose "The Doctor Will See You Now" to submit the page for examination.

Note that, depending on the size of your page, the examination may take a while, so please be patient while Doctor HTML examines the page. Also note that Doctor HTML will NOT examine any page whose HTML and text exceedes 40000 bytes in legnth, unless you or your service provider purchases a Doctor HTML license.

:

Report Format
Type of Tests to Perform
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Doctor HTML Documentation:
1. Doctor HTML FAQ
2. Doctor HTML Help

Doctor HTML is Copyright 1995, 1996 by Thomas Tongue and Imagiware

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Getting the Word Out:
How to Let the World Know Your Page(s) Exist


How to Keep the World From Knowing Your Page(s) Exist

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Speech-Friendly HTML Authoring Utilities

Boxer a text-based HTML authoring utility is available in two flavors:

Personal Page Designer (PPD) is a very simple DOS-based HTML editor which allows you to design a page without any knowledge of HTML

Convert WordPerfect documents to HTML files with Convert HTML files to WordPerfect documents with:
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Designing Accessible Web Pages

The Web Accessibility Initiative's Web Content Accessiblity Guidelines, version 1.0
1) Techniques for Web Content Guidelines, version 1.0
2) full Checklist for WCAG 1.0
3) WAI Accessibility Quick Tips

The Web Accessibility Initiative's unparalelled collection of Web Accessibility Resources

Perhaps the best introduction to web crawling from the "blind point of view" is E. Barnett's Picture This: Designing Web Pages for the Blind

Of particular utility is Judith Dixon's excellent article, Levelling the Road Ahead: Guidelines for the Creation of Web Pages Accessible to Blind and Visually Handicapped Users

The Universal Internet Access Project
1) UIAP's list of enabling technologies
2) UIAP's list of browsers
3) UIAP's list of platforms

The CAST Center's Bobby is an automated verifier, which checks your pages for accessibility...

Dominique Archambault's "livre blanc", Le Web plus accessible pur les aveugles et malvoyants, is also available in English as:

Accessibility Issues as Addressed by W3C

The Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI)

About The Web Accessibility Initiative

W3C Disabilities Developments
1) W3C Position Statement on Disabilities
2) News and Updates
3) Design Guidelines
4) Developments and Specifications
5) White Papers
6) Projects and Research
7) Resources
8) Utilities and Tools
9) Conferences and Events
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Accessibility in Theory and Practice


Web Accessibility & the Law

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Check your pages for Lynx-compatibility (or, rather, comprehesability) with the following simulators:

NOTE: while the only one hundred percent reliable way to judge how your sites are rendered by Lynx is to view them with Lynx--something which can be accomplished via a telnet connection to a server that offers public access to Lynx to anonymous users--the following simulators give you a reasonable idea of how your site will be rendered by a text-based browser

ALT tags

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Web-Accessibility Related Emailing Lists

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White Papers on Web Accessiblity

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Gimmicks and Stupid Site Tricks

Internal Search Engines

Register for Free Home Page at Angelfire Communications

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General HTML Documentation

HTML Help by The Web Design Group is perhaps the most cogent and well-organized site of its kind. Of particular utility are WDG's offline versions of its reference materials.

  1. Web Authoring References
    1. HTML 3.2 (Wilbur) Reference
      1. alphabetical list of all tags
      2. Wilbur Quick Reference
    2. Cascading Style Sheets Guide
    3. Character Set Overview
  2. FAQ Archives
    1. Frequently Asked Web Authoring Questions
    2. Frequently Encountered Problems
    3. CGI Programming FAQ
  3. Design Elements
    1. Style Guide
    2. Standards for HTML Authoring
    3. Image Tips
    4. RGB Color Codes
    5. Using Frames and Accessible Web Sites
  4. Feature Articles
The Bare Bones Guide to HTML, a list of all valid HTML tags in a plain ASCII file, is the the ultimate cheat-sheet
* a hypertext version of The Bare Bones Guide to HTML is also available

Getting a Grip on HTML (version 3.0)
this is the best basic introduction to HTML available online

Working and Background Materials on HTML from W3C
1. W3C Position Statement on HTML
2. HTML Standards
3. HTML 2.0 Specification (September 1995)
4. HTML 3.0 Specification
5. HTML 3.2 Reference Specification
6. Character Entity Codes for HTML 3.2 (ISO Latin 1 Character Set)
7. HTML 4.0 (Cougar) Specification
8. Platform for Privacy Preferences (P3) Project Overview
9. HTML 4.01 Specification
10. Character Entity Sets in HTML4

Working and Background Materials on Style Sheets from W3C
1. Positioning HTML Elements with Cascading Style Sheets
2. Accessibility Features and Advances of CSS
3. Aural Cascading Style Sheets (ACSS)

All Things Web
1. The Usable Web
2. Interface Elements
3. Compatibility and Accessibility
4. Design Fundamentals
5. Technical Tips
6. Webmaster's Corner

The All Text No Nonsense Guide to Web Page Development
Spyglass' Technical Reference for SGML/HTML Developers and Authors

Index Dot HTML: "The Advanced HTML Reference"
Style Sheets Guide Index Page
Cascading Style Sheet FAQ
The University of Paderborn maintains a useful, albeit visually-oriented, collection of HTML documentation, which includes sections on:
  1. HTML document structure
  2. header information
  3. body of document
  4. Form processing and wonderful things
  5. imagemaps.. solved
  6. input fields tags
  7. obsolete features
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More Recommended General Materials


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Resources for Web Consultants and Webmasters

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Un-Lynx-like Links

SLIRP is freeware which allows you to simulate a PPP connection from a shell account. SLIRP is the perfect way to test how your screen-reader(s) work with a graphical browser before you spend your hard-earned cash on a PPP account.
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Terminal Index
1. An American Exegesis
2. Blindness-Related Resources on the Web & Beyond
3. Caveat Lector
4. Civitas: Link Locally, Act Globally
5. Comprehensive List of Blindness-Related Emailing Lists
6. Hystery, Mistory, Prophecy
7. Mea Maxima Culpa
8. The Virtual Museum
9. return to Camera Obscura's front page
9. return to the top of What a Tangled Web We Weave
comments? criticism? suggestions? death threats?
email Gregory J. Rosmaita

copyright 1996-2000, oedipal enterprises, (very) ltd.
a project of cyber-seeing-i

W3C Validated HTML 4.01!       Keep the Web Accessible!       Hand-Constructed Using W3C Validated CSS2!

Best Viewed With ANY Damn Browser! converted to HTML4 & CSS2 March 1999
contents of this page last modified June 7, 2003